How to simplify and streamline your content

Creating content is a valuable way to forge a connection with your customers and prospective customers. Having quality content on your website brings your customers back to your “home base” on a regular schedule, and communicates the idea that you are a trusted authority in your niche.


Have I convinced you yet that content is the key to building your business? Last week we talked about how to get the most out of one piece of content, and so this week I want to talk about streamlining that content for two reasons:

  1. Your customers will connect with your content more easily if it’s easy to consume and has a clear purpose.
  2. You will have an easier time writing the content if you have a clear plan before you begin.

What’s your purpose?

Before you begin to write any piece of content, you should think about your purpose in doing so. Is it…

  • to entertain?
  • to inform or educate?
  • to sell something?

There’s a place for all of these purposes in the content plan for almost every business. Sometimes, it’s even good to combine them – after all, a dry piece of educational content isn’t nearly as fun to read as a witty, entertaining piece of content that also helps you learn something along the way, right? As another example, some of the best sales emails are written with educational content up front and a sales pitch at the end. Where you get into “content trouble” is not knowing what you’re trying to do with your content, or how you will use these three types of content individually or in pairs.

Before you create any piece of content, think first what you most want the customer to do when she finishes with the content, and use that as your overall purpose.

Dividing up the Content Pie

If you think of the content you put out into the world as a pie, how many slices are you devoting to sales content, vs. educational or entertaining content? The answer should be: “not many!” The purpose of a sales pitch is to offer a customer something right in the moment that he’s ready to buy it; but that customer has to have at least a few interactions with you before he’s ready to buy anything. Most people don’t just show up on your website and immediately purchase the first thing they see.

The amount of interaction required will vary with several factors, including:

  • the cost of the item you’re selling
  • the relationship you’ve built up in your industry
  • the customer’s frustration level with his current situation
  • your product’s likely ability to remove his frustration

Think of every piece of content you create as a way to build a relationship with someone who will eventually buy your products or services. How will you introduce that customer to you, your business, and your ability to solve his problems? Use your content to explain that!

Making a Call to Action

When you create content, you should have not only one purpose in mind, but also one action you want the customer to take. If you’re asking someone to click a link here to read a blog post, and then sign up over there for another list, and then find a download in this other place – that’s too many choices. Give your customer ONE thing to do, and it’s more likely that she’s actually going to do it.

Here are some sample calls to action you can make with a single piece of content:

  • sign up for an email list
  • download something (a free PDF or ebook or resource guide)
  • click “like” or “share” or “retweet”
  • forward the email to a friend
  • hit reply and answer a question
  • purchase something

So, to sum up: pick one focus, create plenty of opportunities for your customers to connect with you via content without selling them anything, and pick ONE call to action to bring your reader closer to being a buyer and lifelong fan. Not only will this process make it easier for you to create content, but it makes the content more likely to connect with your audience. It’s a win-win for everyone!

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